Windows 8 Enterprise error code: 0x800F0906 “Windows couldn’t connect to the Internet to download necessary files”

I fought with this one for nearly 8 hours today, attempting to install SSMS from SQL 2012.  This requires that the .Net Framework 3.5 and 2.0 be activated in Windows Features.  Sure, there’s a checkbox that you “should” be able to check and everything works fine.  Well, not for me.  I check it, click OK, it tells me it needs to download files from Windows Update, I say OK, and it throws this error.

Basic troubleshooting courtesy of Google says to make sure Windows Firewall is not blocking the connection, which in my case it wasn’t.  Next, make sure you can get to Windows Update in general, which I could.  Finally, it said to contact your IT administration…..which doesn’t help me because I *am* IT Administration (seriously?)

The solution (at least for me)?  Elevated Command Line!  Earlier I had to also activate my copy of Windows 8 Enterprise via command line thanks to a similar error.  I found this solution in an MS Support article, but here’s the general idea:

  • Run gpedit.msc, and look in Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates > System.
  • Locate the “Specify settings for optional component installation and component repair ” and open it up.
  • Select “Enabled” at the top, and at the bottom, check the box next to “Contact Windows Update directly to download repair content instead of Windows Server Update Services (WSUS)“.
  • Click Apply, then OK.
  • Then run gpupdate /force at command line.

Next, make sure your Windows 8 install media is loaded in your CD/DVD drive, flash drive, wherever, open an elevated command line and type the following:

Dism /online /enable-feature /featurename:NetFx3 /All /Source:<drive>:sourcessxs /LimitAccess

Where <drive> is the drive letter of your Windows 8 media.  It took a few minutes, but worked like a champ!  Now the .Net Framework 3.5 feature was enabled without any errors.

Hope this helps!

Eric

Eric Oszakiewski is a professional software developer based in Scottsdale, AZ with over 35 years of IT experience, and 19 years Native American Gaming experience. He is currently working as a Sr .Net/SharePoint Developer for General Motors, and also as a consultant.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle PlusYouTube

Post BUILD videos now available online

I just returned from BUILD in Redmond, WA this past week, and I can safely say this was one of the best developer events I have ever attended!  Great content, knowledgeable speakers, an ample supply of relevant vendors, all while networking with other developers from all over the globe.  Definitely worth the trip!

You can watch all videos on Channel 9 here, or by visiting http://buildwindows.com.  I’m planning on watching the ones I couldn’t attend due to watching other fantastic sessions that were happening at the same time.  (It was that good!)

Eric

Eric Oszakiewski is a professional software developer based in Scottsdale, AZ with over 35 years of IT experience, and 19 years Native American Gaming experience. He is currently working as a Sr .Net/SharePoint Developer for General Motors, and also as a consultant.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle PlusYouTube

Writing to the ULS in SharePoint 2010

Here’s a quick, easy, 3 step method to log your custom events to the ULS while writing a SharePoint 2010 solution:

  1. Add a reference to Microsoft.Office.Server (located in C:\Program Files\Common Files\Microsoft Shared\Web Server Extensions\14\ISAPI on your SharePoint server)
  2. Add a using statement at the top of your code like so:
    using Microsoft.Office.Server.Diagnostics;
  3. Add the following line wherever you want the message to appear in the ULS
    PortalLog.LogString()

See? That wasn’t so bad!

Eric

Eric Oszakiewski is a professional software developer based in Scottsdale, AZ with over 35 years of IT experience, and 19 years Native American Gaming experience. He is currently working as a Sr .Net/SharePoint Developer for General Motors, and also as a consultant.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle PlusYouTube

Hiding View All Site Content and Recycle Bin in SharePoint 2010

I found a lot of resources online that explain many different ways of doing this, lots of comments saying it worked for them, none of which worked for me.  I even found a tutorial online that explained how to do this using a custom permission, which works, but not when the same users have to have different permissions to underlying objects in the site.  So here’s a method that works at the Master Page level, is customizable, and doesn’t affect all underlying objects whether inherited or not.

Open up the desired site in SharePoint Designer and look in your Master Pages.  Locate your desired master page (mine is v4, like most others).  Many sites say not to alter the master page itself, but to make a copy.  You can do that…..or revert to a previous version if you make a mistake.  Open the file, then click Edit File.

Look for the following element in the code:



Above the bold section, add the following line of code:

Change the blue PermissionsString value to whatever you want.  Multiple permissions can be separated with a comma (no spaces).  Note it should be a permission your target user(s) do not have, and has to come from this list.  Spelling and case-sensitivity is important.  Finally, add the closing tag after the SharePoint:UIVersionedContent closing tag:



Save your changes and test the results.  Those with the correct permissions should be able to see the Recycle Bin and View All Site Content elements in the quick launch area at the bottom, everyone else should not.

Note: This WILL NOT remove View All Site Content from the drop down menu under Site Actions.  To remove View All Site Content from the Site Actions drop down, in the same master page, go up towards the top and look for the following element:

Start scrolling through the MenuItemTemplate elements underneath this one, and look for the one with the id of “MenuItem_ViewAllSiteContents”.


Change the value to be whatever you set it to in the previous code segment above and save your changes.

Hope this helps!

Eric

Eric Oszakiewski is a professional software developer based in Scottsdale, AZ with over 35 years of IT experience, and 19 years Native American Gaming experience. He is currently working as a Sr .Net/SharePoint Developer for General Motors, and also as a consultant.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle PlusYouTube

Windows 8 on HP Pavilion dv7 laptop

I’m going to keep track of installs and changes here, in an effort to prepare for the Windows 8 public release to help others support their installs on their machines.  In my case, I’m installing Windows 8 on a VHD on the local HD, then booting to that VHD instead of my core OS.  This way I’m allocating 100% of my system hardware exclusively to that VHD as a partition.

Machine Specifications
HP Pavilion dv7 laptop
AMD Phenom II P860 Triple Core i5, 2.0GHz
6GB RAM
720GB Hard Drive
Windows 7 SP1 core OS

Windows 8 Developer Preview
Improved boot time, lowered processor usage and RAM allocation, fan spins high and continuously.

Windows 8 RP
Same as above, and fan continues to spin continuously.  A lot of heat is being thrown out of the left side vents, chassis getting hot on the left side.  Modifying advanced power settings to adjust maximum processor usage makes no difference.

Windows 8 RTM
Same as Windows 8 RP, still having fan issues despite advanced power settings, stopping services/processes, etc.

Eric

Eric Oszakiewski is a professional software developer based in Scottsdale, AZ with over 35 years of IT experience, and 19 years Native American Gaming experience. He is currently working as a Sr .Net/SharePoint Developer for General Motors, and also as a consultant.

More Posts - Website

Follow Me:
TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle PlusYouTube